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log 08.28.16

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Grant Ellis has every surfer’s dream job – or at least the one second to being a pro on tour; he is the photo editor at “the bible of the sport,” Surfer Magazine. Like any job though, it’s probably not as easy as one thinks, but to us it seems to involve a lot of pouring over endless streams of surf porn flowing in from the best photographers in the biz. Plus the occasional on-location shoot, which no doubt involves a fair dose of scoring epic waves while not behind the lens shooting them. Ah, the good life. Even if that all is not actually quite the wet dream it appears to be, Grant still has it pretty darn good at home. His wife, Julie, daughter Kaia and son Ethan are awesome and their surf shack by the beach in Cardiff ain’t too shabby either.

FULL STORY

For the first five years of my life, my mom, dad, brother, and I lived in a 400-square-foot, one-bedroom house. But don’t feel too sorry for me. It was on Hanalei Bay, a stone’s throw from Pinetrees. My dad, Jimmy, has lived in this tiny caretaker’s cottage, looking after one of the bay’s first homes and its property for almost 40 years. Originally from Torrance, California, he and his six brothers migrated to Hawaii beginning in the late ‘50s, eventually all finding their way to the North Shore of Kauai by the early ‘70s. Since then, not much has changed. You still get to the cottage through a hole in the bushes, where the plants are quite literally streaked with oil paint, souvenirs from a house filled with dozens of wet, partially finished works of art. My dad doesn’t have much in the way of possessions — he doesn’t have a car or a cell phone, he’s never really used the internet, and his life pretty much exists in a 1-mile radius from his house. When I was a kid, I was embarrassed my dad wasn’t “normal.” Now, I’m both amazed and proud that he’s still living the happy, fulfilling life of a surf/art bum more than 40 years later. I interviewed Mr. Jimmy Irons about life and his tiny Kauai surf shack.

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It’s a story that never gets old: young creative couple moves from the hustle & bustle of the city to quieter, greener (or bluer) pastures to slow things down and focus on their craft more intently and distraction free. That is exactly what Matthew Olerio and Joanna Zamora, the couple behind East Surf Co. did when they recently moved from NYC to the coast of Rhode Island, where they now reside in a beautiful old house built by a boat maker.

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A surf film I directed for Reef a few years back. Just realized I did have the master online, so decided I would post. Such an amazing collaboration with Mark Tesi, the Creative Director that I Directed this alongside. Shot on location in Tahiti, South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, and Bali, the film was inspired by me sitting digging way too deep into Jaques Cousteau documentaries from the 60’s… hence the creative direction and sound sampling.

www.russellbrownley.com
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Surfers have been hooked on neoprene since the 1950s, but it’s a nonrenewable material with an energy-intensive manufacturing process. By replacing it with Yulex® natural rubber from sources that are Forest Stewardship Council® certified by the Rainforest Alliance, Patagonia is reducing CO2 emissions by up to ~80% when compared to conventional neoprene—causing less harm to the planet we love and the oceans that give us waves to ride. Pioneering the use of natural rubber in wetsuits is a story we’re proud to tell—because after six decades of neoprene dependency, it’s high time to set surfing free. The new line includes 21 wetsuits for men, women and kids. Suits range from a Lightweight R1 Long John ($169) to an R5 Hooded Full Suit, meant for the coldest of water ($529). As always, if a Patagonia wetsuit does not perform to the customer’s satisfaction, the company will take it back to repair, refund or replace – a warranty that no other wetsuit manufacturer offers. Check out more info on the world’s most eco-friendly wetsuits here:

www.patagonia.com

Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Laura Austin.

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This boat sauna, designed by goCstudio in Seattle, is not only well designed but photographed beautifully by Kevin Scott. Scale figures are always a must with architectural photography but this brings models and fashion into the mix as well. Fun project that would be a great addition for any sea dweller.

www.gocstudio.com

Getting bogged down by summer heat right about now? Located right at the edge of the wilderness, along the road to the Arctic Sea is one of the coziest and fanciest places to watch the Northern Lights. Kakslauttanen is a hotel next to the Urho Kekkonen National Park, the largest of Finland’s national parks. As the story goes, in the summer of 1973, Jussi (the founder) was on a fishing trip in Utsjoki, Finland’s northernmost village. On the drive back to central Finland, he ran out of fuel. The young man really had no choice but to set up camp where he stood, on a roadside in the middle of the wilderness. The place happened to be called Kakslauttanen. For some inexplicable reason, Jussi felt as if he had come home. He spent his first summer there in a tent. In the second year, a small chalet was erected on the site, and Jussi began to run a café to serve passers-by on their way to North Cape. Little by little, year after year, Kakslauttanen has grown to become Finland’s internationally best-known travel business. It is still being run by Jussi, with great care and attention – the way it has always been. More details and booking info here:

www.kakslauttanen.fi
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“A group of surfers in California have been working for years on perfecting the ability to ride waves without surfboards. Here are some of their exploits.” Ever since the invisible board section of the classic Girl Skateboards flick, Yea Right, I have personally been waiting for some director to the same thing for surfing. Well, that 13 year long wait is finally over! Thank you Foster Huntington and friends, this is just great.

Brought to you by Poler

Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Molly Matalon.

FULL STORY

Those ingenious Swedes over at Teenage Engineering along with the folks at Impossible Project just recently released their latest product, the I-1 Instant Camera. Not only is this camera a thing of beauty that Dieter Rams would be proud of, but it’s also the first instant camera to come out in the past 20 years that can use the original Polaroid format film. But wait, there’s more! You can also use your cell phone as a remote trigger. If only Edwin Land could see his baby now. Go grab yours over in our custom Indoek Shop on Huckberry here:

Buy Now

Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Will Adler.

FULL STORY
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