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log 09.25.16

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Last night we caught a private preview of Apolitical Process, a vision by Kelly Slater, curated by PM Tenore. Featuring artworks by Bruce Reynolds, Kevin Ancell and Todd Glaser. It was a truly awesome and thought-provoking collection of culturally relevant and timely work, which is refreshing to see in the often “ignorance-is-bliss” world of surf culture. Here is a statement about the show:

“This is an artistic journey through the chaotic and sometimes inflammatory 2016 election cycle. It is our aim to explore and expose the underlying truth, hypocrisy, danger, motivations, misinformation and effects of this process. It is our hope that the artwork produces thoughtful discussion, transparency and an openness to question the powers that be…”

The official opening of Apolitical Process is on Thursday, September 22 at Folding Table G: 201 San Juan Ave (corner of Main St.), Venice, Ca 90291 from 7-10 PM and runs through October 9, 2016. Presented by RVCA and Purps.

Sean is a creative nomad, an artist in the truest sense of the word. In the past few years he has driven cross country more than two dozen times documenting his journey in paintings, drawings, photographs and song. He calls Rhode Island home for now, where he spends part of the year. The spot he lives in is the guest house of his good friend who always envisioned owning the property. He said something like “Sean, if I ever own this place, you get the guest house.” And here they are. The rest of the year, Sean travels with on tour with his band Quiet Life and lives in Cali – or wherever the wind takes him.

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Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Kristen Blanton and Matt Jozwiak, AKA Hello America.

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Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Chis Burkard.

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Despite the whole notion of localism, I believe surfers are nomads by nature. We are not defined by the home in which we live, but rather our experiences out in the world, and maybe some physical mementos of those experiences that help us tell our stories. Zak Bush lives in a quiet and cozy, Lebowski-esque bungalow in the heart of Venice. What he stores in his low-key bohemian pad are precious artifacts that all have a story from his travels or his creative endeavors. Whether it is a crusty fin from the reef at Pipeline given to him by Mark Cunningham himself on his 60th birthday. Or handcrafted family heirlooms made from reindeer bones by his Swedish ancestors. Or a huge map of Eastern Canada with all the best surf spots drawn out. These are the things that we consider precious and dear to our hearts. A “surf shack” is not a specific type of architecture or interior design style, it is a reflection of a surfer’s lifestyle where they call home. Zak lives a creatively driven, nomadic lifestyle and his home is a true reflection of his character. We recently paid Zak a visit to talk story, pry some secret Nova Scotia surf locations outta him, and to hear more about what it’s like working for Kelly Slater’s Outerknown brand.

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Director Ian Durkin brings us the feel good surf flick of the year with “The Hold Downs.” Old school silent film style of classic California beach boy antics mixed with modern day hot-dogging and a catchy tune. The Hold Downs is truly a timeless rendition on the good times that come with surfing with your friends and enjoying the coastal lifestyle. Check out more of Ian’s work here:

www.iandurkin.com

First Point Malibu is a weird place. Not only is one of the most ridiculously crowded waves in the world, but the crowd it draws is such an eclectic mix of surfers of all ages, races, styles, socio-economic backgrounds, professions, lack thereof, skill levels, patience levels, etc. Leave it to the Brothers Marshall to capture the essence of the summer swarm and the rawness of the scene in their latest lookbook shot impromptu with real people by Ward Robinson in the midst of a south swell.

brothersmarshall.com

Grant Ellis has every surfer’s dream job – or at least the one second to being a pro on tour; he is the photo editor at “the bible of the sport,” Surfer Magazine. Like any job though, it’s probably not as easy as one thinks, but to us it seems to involve a lot of pouring over endless streams of surf porn flowing in from the best photographers in the biz. Plus the occasional on-location shoot, which no doubt involves a fair dose of scoring epic waves while not behind the lens shooting them. Ah, the good life. Even if that all is not actually quite the wet dream it appears to be, Grant still has it pretty darn good at home. His wife, Julie, daughter Kaia and son Ethan are awesome and their surf shack by the beach in Cardiff ain’t too shabby either.

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For the first five years of my life, my mom, dad, brother, and I lived in a 400-square-foot, one-bedroom house. But don’t feel too sorry for me. It was on Hanalei Bay, a stone’s throw from Pinetrees. My dad, Jimmy, has lived in this tiny caretaker’s cottage, looking after one of the bay’s first homes and its property for almost 40 years. Originally from Torrance, California, he and his six brothers migrated to Hawaii beginning in the late ‘50s, eventually all finding their way to the North Shore of Kauai by the early ‘70s. Since then, not much has changed. You still get to the cottage through a hole in the bushes, where the plants are quite literally streaked with oil paint, souvenirs from a house filled with dozens of wet, partially finished works of art. My dad doesn’t have much in the way of possessions — he doesn’t have a car or a cell phone, he’s never really used the internet, and his life pretty much exists in a 1-mile radius from his house. When I was a kid, I was embarrassed my dad wasn’t “normal.” Now, I’m both amazed and proud that he’s still living the happy, fulfilling life of a surf/art bum more than 40 years later. I interviewed Mr. Jimmy Irons about life and his tiny Kauai surf shack.

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It’s a story that never gets old: young creative couple moves from the hustle & bustle of the city to quieter, greener (or bluer) pastures to slow things down and focus on their craft more intently and distraction free. That is exactly what Matthew Olerio and Joanna Zamora, the couple behind East Surf Co. did when they recently moved from NYC to the coast of Rhode Island, where they now reside in a beautiful old house built by a boat maker.

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A surf film I directed for Reef a few years back. Just realized I did have the master online, so decided I would post. Such an amazing collaboration with Mark Tesi, the Creative Director that I Directed this alongside. Shot on location in Tahiti, South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, and Bali, the film was inspired by me sitting digging way too deep into Jaques Cousteau documentaries from the 60’s… hence the creative direction and sound sampling.

www.russellbrownley.com
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Surfers have been hooked on neoprene since the 1950s, but it’s a nonrenewable material with an energy-intensive manufacturing process. By replacing it with Yulex® natural rubber from sources that are Forest Stewardship Council® certified by the Rainforest Alliance, Patagonia is reducing CO2 emissions by up to ~80% when compared to conventional neoprene—causing less harm to the planet we love and the oceans that give us waves to ride. Pioneering the use of natural rubber in wetsuits is a story we’re proud to tell—because after six decades of neoprene dependency, it’s high time to set surfing free. The new line includes 21 wetsuits for men, women and kids. Suits range from a Lightweight R1 Long John ($169) to an R5 Hooded Full Suit, meant for the coldest of water ($529). As always, if a Patagonia wetsuit does not perform to the customer’s satisfaction, the company will take it back to repair, refund or replace – a warranty that no other wetsuit manufacturer offers. Check out more info on the world’s most eco-friendly wetsuits here:

www.patagonia.com
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