Indoek

Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Chris McClean.

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Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Lauren Ross.

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Filmmaker, Zack Both, converts his van into a livable studio for living on the move. He also created an in depth manual for anyone ambitious enough to take on a similar DYI project. He breaks down step by step on each phase of the project and not only tells you what materials and tools to use but lets you in on some tips and tricks that he figured out the hard way. Not a bad camper for $15k.

thevanual.com

As surfers, we don’t need much. A board, trunks, wetsuit (depending on ocean temperature), and a place to crash near a beach with waves. Even though Manhattan is geographically very close to waves, city-based surfers still depend on a long subway ride out to surf the closest spot: Rockaway Beach in Queens. A place to stay by the beach is a nice little luxury for New York City surfers, it’s just another detail that makes being a surfer there unlike the experience of any other surfer in the world. That common bond between fellow NYC surf addicts can run deep. Justin Jay, Liam Tracy and Jimi Ayers are three very different surfers in NYC who embody this. These three friends live in the city, but met through surfing and now share a small bungalow in Rockaway where they can keep warm while they change in and out of 5 mils and have a place to crash whenever the waves are on.

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Kurt, AKA “Fuzzy” is known by all as one of the good guys, always generous with advice, a story, and a smile. He knows everyone in the industry, and is loved by everyone. He comes from deep in the action sports / surf market, still passionate about music, tight with friends in bands, and knows all the cool young surf crew from Huntington to Trestles. Surfs most days, riding his bike or taking his surf wagon to the beach. Bombs the hill outside his house on his skateboard, and lives larger than the dream.

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Dale Hope is a second-generation Aloha shirt maker who grew up during the era when the Aloha shirt came to be recognized as a spiritual badge. He inherited his parents’ clothing business, bought and served as creative director of the legendary Kahala label, and has also worked with Patagonia on the Pataloha label. Serving as one of Hawaii’s most famous ambassadors for 75+ years, the Aloha shirt comprises a half-billion-dollar-a-year industry. In his gorgeous art book, Dale draws from interviews, media archives, and personal memorabilia to trace their history from right after the Great Depression to today, when they are enjoying a revival. Originally published in 2000, the upcoming new edition features more vintage surf world photography, an intro by Gerry Lopez, and a chapter on Patagonia’s Pataloha shirt, with a tribute to legendary surfer Rell Sunn written by Yvon Chouinard. Coinciding with the publication of the book, Patagonia releases a shirt inspired by Rell and her Aloha spirit.

Patagonia.com

Moving outside of an urban environment can be tough when you’re constrained by the day to day routine of a 9-to-5. It’s families like Damion and Fern’s who appreciate having access to nature that make it happen. I trekked down from Sydney the other week to check out their pad, an A-framed tree house that’s practically bursting with creativity. Nestled in a grove of trees and backing onto an enormous national forest, these two and their son, Jake, seemingly have it made with a perfect blend of urban bustle and rural seclusion.

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Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Trevor King.

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Wayne & Donna Gunther are living the American Dream. In the early ‘90s, they decided to give up their lucrative, fast-paced jobs in fashion and photography to drive 30,000 miles all over the country, collecting artifacts of a certain aesthetic and vision along the way. They ended up in Venice – Abbot Kinney specifically, which was at that point was still an artist in residence community. Surfing Cowboys was born of their travels and eclectic love for California and surf culture, it is essentially a museum of sorts where everything is for sale. Before the internet and eBay, this was the spot to get the rare gems you were looking for, or to find creative inspiration from relics of the past. Once an iconic landmark of Abbot Kinney ’s local character, the shop has since moved a bit east on Venice Boulevard.

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Welcome to our 27 Frames series. We sent 27 single use cameras out to some of our favorite photographers, they shot stuff with it, then mailed it back to us. We developed the film and are sharing the results with you (and the photographers) now. In this instant, digital age, we want to pay homage to a snapshot photo process we grew up with ourselves — waiting for the film to develop and being surprised by the results. These 27 Frames belong to Jason Baffa.

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Ace Kvale turned 60 last fall, and to celebrate, he planned a 60-day, off-trail backpacking trip around Utah’s Canyon Country, leaving from his front door. He had a dozen friends join him for different sections of the trip, and one friend who joined him for the whole thing: his blue heeler, 10-year-old Genghis Khan aka ‘Desert Dog’. Covering over 400 miles on their journey presented it’s challenges but the special relationship between Ace and Genghis proved most powerful. Directed by Brendan Leonard, Forest Woodward and Stefan Hunt.

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Ok, that title might be slightly extreme, but I don’t know a single surfer in the world who doesn’t think that surfing by yourself is awesome. Being alone in the ocean and having all the waves to yourself is both therapeutic and intoxicating. Social media, texting, technology, people, data, those are all things we try to get away from and escape through surfing. Yes, you are alone and disconnected from all that stuff, but isn’t that the goal: to instead connect with nature and yourself in that moment? I don’t know though, maybe I’ve just been doing it wrong all these years.

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