Indoek

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This is a prime example of why I love Kickstarter. Please help George Trimm bring us this rad surf flick reminiscent of grind house films from the 60s shot on Super 8. Here’s the plot: A special forces commando is chosen to go on a perilous mission, deep behind enemy lines. Kilroy is sent on a clandestine operation to uncover the mysteries of the Caldera Network. This mission thrusts Kilroy into a mystic and savage journey into the heart of the unknown. Join Kilroy as he battles ferocious beasts, ethereal gurus, and forbidding landscapes, using a group of surfers as cover to infiltrate and exact his revenge on the criminal thugs.

www.kickstarter.com
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In this clip Buckminster Fuller explains the concept of Vector Equilibrium using a stick model. This clip contains his phrase, “Nature Abhors That Equilibrium” and “You’re watching a beautiful thing.” The latter he states as he demonstrates the contraction of this model which represents the vector forces in the Universe as we know it. Science is cool.

Picking out the right surfboard is a tough decision, whether you are an experienced surfer or a beginner. There are so many different sizes and styles of boards these days fit for any type of surfer and wave conditions – it can be a little overwhelming. We teamed up with our bros at Union Surfboards to make it easier for you to choose the right surfboard design with this helpful decision tree infographic.

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Cape Ann, Massachusetts is a rocky piece of land settled by religious zealots, pirates and witches 150 years before the founding of the United States. Simultaneously home to America’s oldest fishing and fine art community, this is an area where people are fiercely prideful. Here, blue-collar fisherman live side by side with classical musicians and blue-blooded aristocrats.

Keith Natti, a descendent of one of the early prominent families in the area, is someone who epitomizes this community. He is the owner and brains behind a multitude of surf related projects; Twin Lights Glassing, his high-end board glassing business; Natti Surfboards, his custom surfboard shapes and Pinecone Surfboards, his collaborative shapes with his son Gavin. He is also the only professional surf craftsman in an area where interest in the sport has grown exponentially. Natti Surfboards are now a ubiquitous sight at all the local surf spots. Sean Martin recently spent a cold and rainy week in Cape Ann with Natti to capture the life of a true New England waterman.

www.twinlightssurf.com
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Jordan Hoffart not only skates for a living, but he totally immersed himself in the sport at his home. The Canadian native made a personal skate utopia at his house in Vista, California. Hoffart pulled recourses from experienced friends, Josh Hawkins and Kyle Berard, in order to create a fully skate-able property equipped with mini-quarter pipe, lips, ledges, kickers, and a bowl that took around six weeks to build. Wouldn’t mind waking up to this everyday!

www.hypebeast.com

Steve Zeldin is a surf media legend. In the year 2001, instead of the world ending with a space baby or Y2K fallout, Steve created the best surf publication of all time: Water Magazine. Water was an honest and refreshing take on modern surf culture at the time, in my opinion it elevated surfing to a new creative aesthetic and changed the surf media game forever. Before Water Mag, Steve was a jack-of-all-trades at Surfing, then Publisher / Editor-In-Chief at Transwold Surf. Now he is backing the latest in surf media gems, What Youth. Needless to say, his professional career has centered around documenting our beloved sport and the beautiful lifestyle that surrounds it. Last month I spent an afternoon with the great Zeldini at his beach-front pad in Newport Beach for a little glimpse into his world and to take many, many notes. Please note: This is a homage to Steve’s infamous 20-30 page Water Magazine interviews. In other words, because I am a super-fan of Steve’s work, this interview is a little longer than usual. So get cozy, apply some sunscreen for a little laptop tan and settle on in for the long read.

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In the Spring of 2014 a small group of close friends broke ground on a building project in Skamania County, Washington in the Columbia River Gorge. Their primary endeavor was a multi-platform tree house, but also included a skate bowl and a wood fired soaking tub as well. The crew came from all over the country and from a variety of backgrounds. Some were professional carpenters, others learned on the job, gaining experience along the way. The Cinder Cone is Foster Huntington’s short film that documents this year-long process of building his dream home with this community of tight knit friends. Check out the Kickstarter for the book here:

www.kickstarter.com
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Kung Fury is an over-the-top 80’s action comedy that was crowd funded through Kickstarter. It features Kung Fury, a Kung Fu renegade cop who travels back in time to kill his Nemesis, Hitler. The film features nazis, dinosaurs, vikings and cheesy one-liners. The campaign that was launched in December, 2013 was backed by more than 17,000 people who together gave more than $630,000. This love letter to the 80’s by director David Sandberg makes me want to take back all the things I said about the internet ruining creativity.

www.kungfury.com
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Happy Friday! Here’s a little afternoon delight: a behind-the-scenes edit featuring model, Rocky Barnes shot by Steven Lippman for Malibu Mag. It’d actually be a pretty sweet pool to skate if it weren’t for all the damn water being sprayed and smoking hot babes running around in it.

www.malibumag.com
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No this is not a joke, yes it is really happening. This is a trailer for the Point Break reboot movie – which is basically the original Point Break on steroids and Red Bull (and in wingsuits). What drives me crazier than yet another Hollywood remake is that this is a remake of a movie that really should not be remade. All the things we love (and love to hate) about the original film were rooted in the actors and the time period. Point Break is surfing’s dark age that was the 90s. Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves epitomized surfer stereotypes in the most uncomfortable ways possible. Why a cult classic just be left alone for once? It had it’s time and we continue to celebrate it by quoting the many iconic Bodhi and Johnny Utah lines – and we even have Point Break Live to further continue the joke. But no, Hollywood can’t help itself from doing the same thing it always does: copy and dilute an original formula that made buttloads of money in the past, therefore a recycled version (or perhaps a sequel) will do the same. And we can’t help but fall for it every time. Hopefully this version will also be “so bad, it’s good.”

www.pointbreakmovie.com
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Nothing will take you back you those teen angst years quite like a little Rage Against The Machine. Here is full concert footage of the band’s first ever public performance at The Quad, Cal State Northridge, Northridge, CA on Oct. 23, 1991 in all of its gritty, poor quality VHS glory. It’s not often that a band’s very first concert was caught on film in its entirety like this. Enjoy!

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